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Coombes Sixth Form

Religious Studies: Philosophy and Ethics

This course aims to develop your interest in and enthusiasm for a rigorous study of religion, and relate it to the wider world. You’ll study the influence of ancient Greek philosophy, then apply ethical theories, Utilitarianism and religious ethics to issues including abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering and war and peace. You’ll have the opportunity to develop your own personal values and opinions in light of your learning.

seyhr

Year 13 student

"I'm currently studying Philosophy and Ethics, Psychology and English Literature and Language at A level. I enjoy all my subjects, especially with the extra help and support from all my teachers and the positive vibe at Coombe. I'm passionate about philosophy, ethics, beliefs and values, and I aspire to study Religious Studies at University, before taking a teaching degree and becoming a secondary school teacher."

meet the department

Head of Department; Mrs E Ziriat

'Wisest is he who knows he knows nothing', this famous Socratic quote may give you some idea why students choose to study RS Philosophy and Ethics.  Philosophy students are often concerned with the bigger questions in life and like to be critical about what knowledge they accept.  RS Philosophy and Ethics gives the student an opportunity to look at these bigger questions and analyse a range of different arguments from a variety of scholars.  Students are required to reflect on and use specific knowledge to write essays which are insightful and demonstrate a balanced, well thought out argument.  You will travel through time looking at how philosophical arguments have developed to reflect different worldviews and so begin to appreciate that these debates still continue today.  Arguably RS Philosophy and Ethics continues to be one of the most relevant and engaging subjects you can study at A level and can lead on to a wide variety of university courses.  Studying RS Philosophy and Ethics opens doors in the world of higher education rather than closing them.'